This Day in History: FDR inaugurated, March 4, 1933

Man He Became by James Tobin
Man He Became by James Tobin

"Many books have been written about Franklin Roosevelt's life in politics, but here Tobin takes a risk by telling the story of one of the country's most popular presidents from a largely unexplored angle. As the subtitle suggests, this book looks at Roosevelt's life from the time he contracted polio to the time he became president, and does so with a compassionate view. To keep the book from becoming a maudlin sympathy tale, Tobin considers some obvious but important questions: How did Roosevelt overcome his "handicap" to become president? Would he have become president had he not contracted polio? What effect did his affliction have on him personally? How did his accomplishments affect the perception of handicapped persons generally? The conclusion may be surprising to many: "that he became president because of polio" and the advantages it afforded him during a turbulent period in Democratic Party politics. Personal items are not glossed over—Tobin makes it clear that F.D.R. was not always kindest to those closest to him and that his family life was tense—and the myriad medical and political details are coupled with glimpses of his vulnerable moments. Tobin's balanced and detailed approach offers a well-rounded look at a slice of F.D.R.'s life generally obscured from popular accounts, and it makes for fascinating reading." ~ Publishers Weekly

March Mysteries

The Strangler Vine by M. J. Carter

The Strangler Vine by M. J. Carter

While tracking down a missing writer who has exposed the true nature of Calcutta society in 1937 India, a young soldier with few prospects, a secret political agent and a master of disguise are drawn into the mysterious Thuggee cult and its even more ominous suppression. (Publisher Summary)

Stranger by Harlan Coben
Stranger by Harlan Coben

The Stranger appears out of nowhere, perhaps in a bar, or a parking lot, or at the grocery store. His identity is unknown. His motives are unclear. His information is undeniable. Then he whispers a few words in your ear and disappears, leaving you picking up the pieces of your shattered world. Adam Price has a lot to lose: a comfortable marriage to a beautiful woman, two wonderful sons, and all the trappings of the American Dream: a big house, a good job, a seemingly perfect life. Then he runs into the Stranger. (Publisher Summary)

Someone Is Watching by Joy Fielding

Someone Is Watching by Joy Fielding

Devastated by a brutal attack, private investigator Bailey Carpenter withdraws to spend her time staring out her apartment window with her binoculars, noting especially the hunky guy across the way. One day, she finds him staring back mockingly and becomes convinced that he's her attacker. (Library Journal)

Leaving Berlin by Joseph Kanon


Leaving Berlin by Joseph Kanon

Alex Meier, a young Jewish writer who fled the Nazis for America before the war, runs afoul of McCarthyites and can forestall his deportation only by agreeing to return to Berlin as an agent for the CIA. Then he discovers that his real task is to spy on the woman he loved and left behind. (Library Journal)

Life or Death by Michael Robotham
Life or Death by Michael Robotham

Audie was sentenced to 10 years for a robbery in which four people died, including two members of his gang. Five million dollars has never been recovered from the robbery, and everybody believes Audie knows where the money is. For 10 years Audie has been beaten, stabbed, and threatened by inmates and guards, all desperate to know the secret. The day before he is due to be released, Audie suddenly vanishes.  (Publisher Summary)

This Day in History: Theodor Seuss Geisel, March 2, 1904

Dr. Seuss Goes to War by Richard H. Minear
Dr. Seuss Goes to War by Richard H. Minear

A treasure trove of World War II-era political cartoons by the creator of The Cat in the Hat. For decades, readers throughout the world have enjoyed the wonderful stories and illustrations of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. But few know Geisel's work as a political cartoonist for the New York daily newspaper PM during World War II. In these trenchant cartoons, Geisel captured the Zeitgeist--especially the attitudes of the New Deal liberals who read PM--with signature Seussian flair. Dr. Seuss Goes to War features handsome, large-format reproductions of almost 200 of the best of Geisel's cartoons from this time. The cartoons savage Hitler, Japan, Stalin, Mussolini, and "isolationist" leaders such as Charles Lindbergh. They exhort readers to give full support to the war effort, put up with shortages, buy U. S. savings bonds, and help control inflation. They are sharply critical of anti-Semitism and anti-black racism--and, shockingly, undeniably racist in their portrayal of Japanese Americans. An introduction and commentary by Richard H. Minear, historian of the era and author of Victors' Justice, place them in context and illuminate the national climate they reflect. Lovers of Dr. Seuss will take renewed delight in his whimsical and imaginative illustrations even as they may be disturbed by the attitudes reflected in some of his work. Those for whom World War II is an abiding passion will find a brand-new look at the war and American involvement. And those concerned with American attitudes--particularly in the press--will find that Dr. Seuss's cartoons of 1941 and 1942 bring back to life the mood and the issues of the day. (Publisher Summary)

New Laura Lippman

Hush Hush by Laura Lippman
On a searing August day, Melisandre Harris Dawes committed the unthinkable: she left her two-month-old daughter locked in a car while she sat nearby on the shores of the Patapsco River. Melisandre was found not guilty by reason of criminal insanity. Freed, she left the country, her husband and her two surviving children, determined to start over. But now Melisandre has returned Baltimore to meet with her estranged teenage daughters and wants to film the reunion for a documentary. (Publisher Summary)

Hush Hush received a starred review from Booklist Reviews: "with an intriguing cast of characters, stinging dialogue, hilarious moments, and a superbly convoluted and suspenseful plot, Lippman has created an incisive and provocative tale about parents good and evil."

Click here to place a hold on this new mystery today!

February is Black History Month

Before February moves into March, don't forget to check out the book display on the main floor of the library that is dedicated to books celebrating the achievements of black Americans. Here is just a sample of what you will find:
Martin Luther King, Jr. by Marshall Frady

Eye on the Struggle by James McGrath Morris

Rosa Parks by Douglas Brinkley

Eye on the Struggle by James McGrath Morris
Describes the life and career of the journalist and network news commentator who publicly asked President Eisenhower to support desegregation and covered such important civil rights events as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the desegregation crisis in Little Rock. (Publisher Summary)

Rosa Parks by Douglas Brinkley
A portrait of the African-American woman who is immortalized for refusing to surrender her bus seat to a white passenger examines who Rosa Parks was before, during, and after her historic act and how her action contributed to the end of the Jim Crow laws. (Publisher Summary)

Martin Luther King, Jr. by Marshall Frady
A renowned biographer presents an intimate and inspiring portrait of Martin Luther King, Jr., drawn from twenty-five years of award-winning commentary on American race relations, that combines the history of the civil rights movement with King's powerful rise to acclaim and influence, bringing to life his political relationships, his goals, and his achievements. (Publisher Summary)